Nap duration is positively correlated with the risk of hyperuricemia in Chinese

Insufficient sleep or disrupted sleep-wake cycles are associated with metabolic disorders.
However, few studies have examined the relationship between daily sleep duration and hyperuricemia.
Abstract: A study was published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism to investigate the relationship between daily sleep time (daytime nap and nighttime sleep) and the risk of hyperuricemia.

The researchers performed a cross-sectional analysis of Chinese Multi-ethnic Cohort (CMEC) data from the Yunnan region.
In 2018, researchers recruited 22,038 people between the ages of 30 and 79.
Hyperuricemia is defined as serum uric acid (SUA) higher than 7.0 mg/dL in men and 6.0 mg/dL in women.
The outcome of this study was the association between daily sleep duration and hyperuricemia.

The investigators found that daytime sleep duration was associated with the risk of hyperuricemia, both in the original model [OR (95%CI) 2.22 (1.88,2.61), P < 0.0001] and in a multivariate adjusted model after adjusting for demographic, sleep habits, and metabolic risk factors [OR: 1.69; 95%CI:(1.41, 2.01), P < 0.0001].
When serum creatinine was added to the adjusted model, the correlation was reduced [OR: 1.54; 95%CI:(1.28, 1.86), P < 0.0001].

Longer nap times were also associated with a higher risk of hyperuricemia with metabolic syndrome (METS).
In the fully adjusted model, napping longer than 90 minutes was associated with a higher risk of hyperuricemia with metabolic syndrome [OR: 1.39; 95%CI:(1.06, 1.79); P < 0.001].
In this study, the researchers did not observe any relationship between the duration of sleep at night and the risk of hyperuricemia.

In conclusion, longer nap time (but not nocturnal sleep time) is independently associated with the risk of hyperuricemia in the Chinese population.

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